Gov. Wolf: Eight More Counties Going Green on June 19

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Governor Tom Wolf today announced that eight more counties will move to the green phase of reopening from the COVID-19 pandemic at 12:01 a.m. on Friday, June 19. These counties include Dauphin, Franklin, Huntingdon, Luzerne, Monroe, Perry, Pike, and Schuylkill.

Effective today, there are 46 counties in green and 21 in yellow.

The data dashboard of county cases and criteria for reopening consideration can be found here.

Gov. Wolf’s Process to Reopen Pennsylvania outlines remaining restrictions for counties in yellow or green.

As counties reopen, Pennsylvania continues to see a steady decline in cases, a positive indicator that its phased, measured reopening plan is working to balance public health with economic recovery.

According to analysis by the New York Times, new COVID-19 cases are declining in less than half of all U.S. states and territories.

“In Pennsylvania, not only did we flatten the curve, but we are continuing to keep case counts down even as we open our commonwealth,” Gov. Wolf said. “We will continue to take a measured, phased approach to reopening that relies on science and health experts.”

Yellow Phase
As of June 12, these 21 counties are in the yellow phase: Berks, Bucks, Chester, Dauphin, Delaware, Erie, Franklin, Huntingdon, Lackawanna, Lancaster, Lebanon, Lehigh, Luzerne, Monroe, Montgomery, Northampton, Perry, Philadelphia, Pike, Schuylkill, and Susquehanna.

As regions or counties move into the yellow phase, some restrictions on work and social interaction will ease while others, such as closures of schools, gyms, and other indoor recreation centers, hair and nail salons, as well as limitations around large gatherings, remain in place.

The purpose of this phase is to begin to power back up the economy while keeping a close eye on the public health data to ensure the spread of disease remains contained to the greatest extent possible.

Work and Congregate Setting Restrictions

Telework Must Continue Where Feasible
Businesses with In-Person Operations Must Follow Business and Building Safety Orders
Child Care May Open Complying with Guidance
Congregate Care and Prison Restrictions in Place
Schools may provide in-person instruction only in accordance with Department of Education guidance
Social Restrictions

Stay-at-Home Order Lifted for Aggressive Mitigation
Large Gatherings of More than 25 Prohibited
Masks are Required When Entering a Business
In-Person Retail Allowable, Curbside and Delivery Preferable
Indoor Recreation, Health and Wellness Facilities and Personal Care Services (such as gyms, spas, hair salons, nail salons and other entities that provide massage therapy), and all Entertainment (such as casinos, theaters) Remain Closed
Restaurants and Bars May Open Outdoor Dining, in Addition to Carry-Out and Delivery
Green Phase
As of June 12, these 46 counties are in the green phase: Adams, Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Bedford, Blair, Bradford, Butler, Cambria, Cameron, Carbon, Centre, Clarion, Clearfield, Clinton, Columbia, Crawford, Cumberland, Elk, Fayette, Forest, Fulton, Greene, Indiana, Juniata, Jefferson, Lawrence, Lycoming, McKean, Mercer, Mifflin, Montour, Northumberland, Potter, Snyder, Somerset, Sullivan, Tioga, Union, Venango, Warren, Washington, Wayne, Westmoreland, Wyoming, and York.

After a county transitions to the yellow phase, it is closely monitored for increased risk, such as significant outbreaks. If overall risk remains mitigated for 14 days, the county will transition to the green phase.

The green phase eases most restrictions by lifting the stay-at-home and business closure orders to allow the economy to strategically reopen while continuing to prioritize public health. Some restrictions, such as mask-wearing, do remain in place.

While this phase facilitates a return to a “new normal,” it is equally important to continue to monitor public health indicators and adjust orders and restrictions as necessary to ensure the spread of disease remains at a minimum.

Work and Congregate Settings Restrictions

Continued Telework Strongly Encouraged
Businesses with In-Person Operations Must Follow Updated Business and Building Safety Requirements
All Businesses Operating at 50% Occupancy in the Yellow Phase May Increase to 75% Occupancy
Child Care May Open Complying with Guidance
Congregate Care Restrictions in Place
Prison and Hospital Restrictions Determined by Individual Facilities
Schools Subject to CDC and Commonwealth Guidance
Social Restrictions

Large Gatherings of More Than 250 Prohibited
Masks are Required When Entering a Business
Restaurants and Bars Open at 50% Occupancy
Personal Care Services (including hair salons and barbershops) Open at 50% Occupancy and by Appointment Only
Indoor Recreation, Health and Wellness Facilities, and Personal Care Services (such as gyms and spas) Open at 50% Occupancy with Appointments Strongly Encouraged
All Entertainment (such as casinos, theaters, and shopping malls) Open at 50% Occupancy
Construction Activity May Return to Full Capacity with Continued Implementation of Protocols
After a county transitions to the yellow phase, the commonwealth closely monitors for increased risk, such as significant outbreaks. If overall risk remains mitigated for fourteen days, we will transition the county to the green phase.

The state continues to use risk-based metrics from Carnegie Mellon University and the Department of Health and Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency data dashboard available here.

The state continues to increase testing and ramp up contact-tracing efforts. As of June 11, there are a total of 496 contact tracers, and a total of 2,777 contacts being monitored. The Department of Health received a total of 80,498 test results in the past seven days, an average of 11,500 a day. The 30-day average of test results received is more than 10,500.

There were 3,371 new cases added to investigations for the week of June 4 through 11.

The latest business guidance, including outdoor recreation guidance, can be found here.

Preliminary sports guidance can be found here.

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